#45. Become a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) or guardian at litem (GAL) for foster children.

A CASA or GAL is a person appointed by a court to represent a child's best interest in cases of abuse or neglect. People of all kinds of backgrounds volunteer as CASAs and GALs. There's no prior special training required (you receive training as part of the onboarding process). The most effective CASA or GAL … Continue reading #45. Become a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) or guardian at litem (GAL) for foster children.

#34. Babysit siblings so parents can take foster children to appointments.

Many foster parents care for both biological children and foster children. Foster children may have time-consuming and complicated appointment schedules (e.g. therapy sessions, doctor's appointments, vistiation dates, caseworker check ups). You can give the parents a bit of breathing room by offering to watch the other kids while they take their foster children through these … Continue reading #34. Babysit siblings so parents can take foster children to appointments.

#33. Advocate for informed consent laws regarding ultrasound viewing.

Women seeking abortion are entitled to informed consent, which should include information about the development of their embryo or fetus. Research has found that when women seeking abortion are offered the option to view their ultrasounds, over 40% choose to do so. The same research finds that, as a result of viewing the ultrasound, some … Continue reading #33. Advocate for informed consent laws regarding ultrasound viewing.

#30. Support women with unintended pregnancies in your church.

Please note this entry is written with Christian readers in mind, but we hope the ideas are also useful to Jews, Muslims, and anyone else who regularly participates in a religious community. Surveys suggest approximately 4 in 10 women who get abortions were attending church regularly at the time they aborted. While many churches work … Continue reading #30. Support women with unintended pregnancies in your church.

#25. Work with local high schools to support pregnant and parenting students.

Title IX is a law that prevents any school which receives federal money from discriminating against students on the basis of sex, including on the basis of pregnancy or parenting status. Schools that receive federal money are required to allow pregnant students to continue participating in classes and extra curricular activities; choose whether to participate … Continue reading #25. Work with local high schools to support pregnant and parenting students.

#24. Give adoptive and foster families books with adoption and foster themes.

Representation matters, and one way to help adopted and foster children and their families feel seen, heard, and supported is to give them books that reflect their circumstances. If you are friends with adoptive and foster families, ask them if you can gift their children some of these books. If you don't personally know adoptive … Continue reading #24. Give adoptive and foster families books with adoption and foster themes.

#23. Advocate for perinatal hospice notification.

Perinatal hospice provides support to parents experiencing a pregnancy in which the child has a life-limiting condition that may result in the child's death before or shortly after birth. The services can include birth planning; emotional support for the parents; warmth, comfort, and nutrition for the newborn; and medical treatments to improve the baby's quality … Continue reading #23. Advocate for perinatal hospice notification.

#17. Talk to medical providers about how they deliver prenatal Down syndrome diagnoses.

Prenatal diagnoses of Down syndrome are highly correlated with abortion, and many women have reported that medical personnel either assumed they would want to abort or overtly pressured them to do so. It's not uncommon for doctors to talk about the health risks associated with Down syndrome, explain how to obtain an abortion, and then … Continue reading #17. Talk to medical providers about how they deliver prenatal Down syndrome diagnoses.

#14. Donate supplies to child welfare agencies.

Connect with local child welfare agencies or specific child welfare workers and find out what supplies the children they work with need most often. You may be able to help with toys for visitation rooms; socks and underwear for children with too few clothes; blankets, quilts, and stuffed animals for children as they enter care; … Continue reading #14. Donate supplies to child welfare agencies.